Best Practices – Utility Cuts in Concrete Pavement

Concrete pavements have long been recognized as clean, smooth riding, strong, and durable, and properly designed and constructed concrete pavements should provide several decades of zero- to low-maintenance service. At times, it is necessary to cut trenches in some concrete pavements, particularly in urban areas, in order to repair or install utilities such as sewers, drainage structures, water mains, gas mains and service
lines, telecommunication lines, and power conduits. Unless the cost of trenchless methods that do not disturb the pavement is justified, the pavement must be opened up, the utility installed or repaired, and the pavement restored using a utility cut restoration. If these operations are carried out properly (see Appendix 1 for the step-by-step process of making a utility cut in a concrete pavement), there will be minimal impact on the pavement’s functional serviceability, ride quality, and lifespan.

Utility Cuts in Concrete Pavements – ACPA

Concrete pavements have long been recognized as clean, smooth riding, strong, and durable, and properly designed and constructed concrete pavements should provide several decades of zero- to low-maintenance service. At times, it is necessary to cut trenches in some concrete pavements, particularly in urban areas, in order to repair or install utilities such as sewers, drainage structures, water mains, gas mains and service lines, telecommunication lines, and power conduits.

Guide Specification for Materials and Construction of Jointed Unreinforced Concrete Pavement Parking Lots

Jointed unreinforced concrete parking lots may be designed using various methods; however, NRMCA recommends using the American Concrete Institute (ACI) procedure 330R-08 Guide for the Design and Construction of Concrete Parking Lots which specifically addresses the unique loading conditions, durability considerations, and joint layout patterns inherent to parking lots. ACI 330R-08 can be obtained from ACI at www.concrete.org.

Shedding Light on Concrete’s Reflectivity – NRMCA

Due to its lighter color and uniform surface texture, the high reflectivity of a concrete pavement provides greater luminance than other typical pavements. In fact, studies show that a concrete pavement’s average luminance is 1.77 times higher than asphalt.

Case Study – Monache High School Parking Lot

Porterville Unified School District needed to replace failed asphalt parking lot. The old pavement was ground and reused as base for the new concrete surface. The need to reduce maintenance costs coupled with limited access after solar panels were installed made concrete the clear choice.

Article – Full Depth Reclamation Solves Construction Problems in Wet and Weak Soils

On average, 57,000 tons of cargo is pushed through the Port of Seattle’s Terminal 115 each month. Located just south of downtown Seattle, the terminal is occupied by Northland Services Inc., the port’s fourth-largest tenant.

The busy yard takes a lot of pounding, so when rehabilitation became necessary, special consideration was given to the available alternatives before deciding on a paving and pavement foundation method. A method of pavement rehabilitation known as full-depth reclamation proved to be the foundation method of choice, as it provided greater strength and durability than most of the other pavement alternatives.

Project Profile – Monache High School Parking Lot with Solar

Porterville Unified School District needed to replace failed asphalt parking lot. The old pavement was ground and reused as base for the new concrete surface. The need to reduce maintenance costs coupled with limited access after solar panels were installed made concrete the clear choice.

Using Pervious Concrete to Earn LEED Points

Pervious concrete is a unique and innovative means to manage stormwater. When pervious concrete is used in building site design, it can aid in the process of qualifying for LEED Green Building Rating System credits. Pervious concrete has been used successfully in many types of construction on applications such as parking lots, streets, plazas, nature trails and walkways. While pervious concrete can be used for a surprising number of applications, its primary use is in pavement.

Storm Water Solutions – Bay Area Pervious Concrete

Imperviousness refers to the inability of a surface to allow water to percolate through. A sponge is pervious, a countertop is impervious, cardboard is somewhere in between. Sandy soils are pervious; asphalt is not. On an impervious surface, water is forced to travel downhill until it finds a place it can sink into soil or enter a wetland.